Camille LaRocca

Camille is what I am called. I strive to be a photographer and writing is my passion.

"What is your favorite thing about yourself?" "My hair." "& why is that?" "It represents my personality. Kind of all over the place."

"What is your favorite thing about yourself?" "My hair." "& why is that?" "It represents my personality. Kind of all over the place."

Words like knives

Everyone is so caught up in the fake image of stereotypes and cliques.

Overhearing these harsh words about “preps” and “bad kids” and “leadership kids”, though they don’t really know anything at all about these kids they call their peers.

Though the world is hurting so deeply, we, as humans, blindly add to that pain through our words and our actions.

I will forever wish peace and kindness to come from my lips.

Something that has always intrigued and interested me is Feminism. I’ve always known about the concept, but only identified it with the crazy women who abused it to be treated like a princess and bash on men. For years, if someone asked me if I was a feminist, I would say “Of course not!” To me, all that meant was that I was above all men. Honestly, I thought that up until this year.
Of course, when I did my research I found that this idea was not that women are better than men, but that we are equal. For school I read through three books that made me realize that in the past I have put up with a lot of mistreatment by men that I never realized before. Really, looking into this topic not only helped keep me informed, but made me a stronger women. Now, if someone asked me if I am a feminist I would say “Yes, who wouldn’t be? It just means women are a lot more than dirt.”
The first book I read was Thousand Pieces of Gold by Ruthanne Lum McCunn. This read was extremely interesting because it gave me the point of view of a woman from another country and culture. In the novel, a chinese girl is sold by her father to feed her family. She is sold to a group of men who take her to American to force her to become a prostitute, where all the money she makes would go to them. Fortunately, she is bought by a kind American man who sees her as more than that and tries to make her his wife. Reading this was quite sad because I know this still happens in other countries and did even more years ago. This book gave me knowledge on how far we have come in the U.S. It is disgusting that women were seen as property, something without feeling or a voice. This book was the most severe out of the three I read, but it was also inspiring. The girl in the novel went through so much, but through it all she never once believed that all she was is what the men said. She would collect pieces of gold to pay for her escape and create a life for herself.
The third book I read was complete opposite than the others, but was one of the most interesting ideas I’ve ever heard. It was called Whistling Vivaldi by Claude M. Steele. When I first heard the term “gender stereotypes” it was in Psychology and I could not stop thinking about it. Gender stereotypes are generalizations about gender attributes, differences, and roles of individuals or groups. For example, the female stereotypical role is to marry and have children. She is also to put her family’s welfare before her own; be loving, compassionate, caring, nurturing, and sympathetic; and find time to be sexy and beautiful. The male stereotypical role is to be the financial provider. He is also to be assertive, competitive, independent, courageous, career-focused, hold his emotions in, and always initiate sex. I personally disagree with these labels. Why should anyone be told how they should act? Something else that surprised me was the thought that if these labels weren’t programed into us since we were children, how different would our skills and personality be? Like math. It is said that men are supposed to be better at math than women. If I wasn’t told that, would I actually be better at it than I am? Just something to think about.

Something that has always intrigued and interested me is Feminism. I’ve always known about the concept, but only identified it with the crazy women who abused it to be treated like a princess and bash on men. For years, if someone asked me if I was a feminist, I would say “Of course not!” To me, all that meant was that I was above all men. Honestly, I thought that up until this year.

Of course, when I did my research I found that this idea was not that women are better than men, but that we are equal. For school I read through three books that made me realize that in the past I have put up with a lot of mistreatment by men that I never realized before. Really, looking into this topic not only helped keep me informed, but made me a stronger women. Now, if someone asked me if I am a feminist I would say “Yes, who wouldn’t be? It just means women are a lot more than dirt.”

The first book I read was Thousand Pieces of Gold by Ruthanne Lum McCunn. This read was extremely interesting because it gave me the point of view of a woman from another country and culture. In the novel, a chinese girl is sold by her father to feed her family. She is sold to a group of men who take her to American to force her to become a prostitute, where all the money she makes would go to them. Fortunately, she is bought by a kind American man who sees her as more than that and tries to make her his wife. 
Reading this was quite sad because I know this still happens in other countries and did even more years ago. This book gave me knowledge on how far we have come in the U.S. It is disgusting that women were seen as property, something without feeling or a voice. This book was the most severe out of the three I read, but it was also inspiring. The girl in the novel went through so much, but through it all she never once believed that all she was is what the men said. She would collect pieces of gold to pay for her escape and create a life for herself.

The third book I read was complete opposite than the others, but was one of the most interesting ideas I’ve ever heard. It was called Whistling Vivaldi by Claude M. Steele. When I first heard the term “gender stereotypes” it was in Psychology and I could not stop thinking about it. Gender stereotypes are generalizations about gender attributes, differences, and roles of individuals or groups. For example, the female stereotypical role is to marry and have children. She is also to put her family’s welfare before her own; be loving, compassionate, caring, nurturing, and sympathetic; and find time to be sexy and beautiful. The male stereotypical role is to be the financial provider. He is also to be assertive, competitive, independent, courageous, career-focused, hold his emotions in, and always initiate sex. I personally disagree with these labels. Why should anyone be told how they should act? Something else that surprised me was the thought that if these labels weren’t programed into us since we were children, how different would our skills and personality be? Like math. It is said that men are supposed to be better at math than women. If I wasn’t told that, would I actually be better at it than I am? Just something to think about.

whatever-joey:

#YesAllWomen is trending on Twitter right now.

This is very important. 

Right now, men just need to shut up, read these and learn. We HAVE to do better.

plaxtic:

There are millions of women world wide who are denied education and reproductive health care and legislative agency on the basis of their womanhood, and yet there are still white women with the audacity to say that feminism is unnecessary because ‘they have all the rights they need’

When people call people nerds most likely what they are saying is “You like stuff”, which is not a good insult at all. Like, “you are too enthusiastic about the miracle of human consciousness.”